Tag Archives: horseback riding

Daisies and Butterflies

I don’t aspire to be a writer. I have no desire to be a well-known, gal-of-the-moment blogger with a million followers. Lord knows I’m not equipped for any of that. I simply write because sometimes I feel God puts something on my heart I’m meant to share. I’m usually pretty good at following His prompts. The one thing I absolutely do not ever in a million years want to do is pen posts solely about daisies and butterflies. In other words—I want only to keep it real. The good. The bad. The ugly. Real.

I write a lot about munchkin’s achievements. And they blessedly are ever increasing. But my heart was really pricked this past Wednesday at Jackson’s weekly equine therapy session at Hopes, Dreams and Horses. It was a lackluster day at best. The instructor, Miss Kristy, had the same basic commands on repeat this day. She could’ve simply recorded a voice memo and pressed the repeat button, with an amplifier attached. “Sit up straight.” “Butt down.” “Elbows in.” “Heels down.” Hands to pockets.” “Keep those elbows in!” “Keep that butt in the saddle!” “Sit up!” Bless her. No, really. Bless her!

When you have no control, just sit a spell.

When you have no control, just sit a spell.

Jackson has been riding here weekly for two solid years. And he loves it here. He loves horses. He loves to ride. But sometimes, he just can’t put it all together no matter how many times he’s heard it or done it. It’s as if it’s his (let’s be honest without hyperbole) third or fourth time on horseback. These are the days I take a deep breath and remind myself that we’ve come a long way with a long way to go.
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So why am I sharing this non-newsworthy drivel? Because someone out there needs to know that it’s not all daisies and butterflies all the time. It’s two steps forward and one step back. Or one step forward and two steps back. All that matters is that you’re making progress. Whatever that progress is, own it. Own it! Did you hear that? Own it! Don’t let me or anyone else out there whose stuff you read on social media (the interwebs!) cause you to feel less than you (or heaven forbid, your child) are/is.

I’m just sayin’… You’re awesome. Continue to fight the good fight, no matter what that fight is. Just keep moving. It’s gonna be okay.

The only limit to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today. ~Franklin D. Roosevelt

An Independent Rider

I’ve previously written about Jackon’s horseback riding lessons but his experience at summer camp is a different story worth telling. Jackson just completed his second week of summer camp at Hopes, Dreams and Horses’ Camp Horse Power.

Week one was a welcome return to Hopes, Dreams and Horses (“HDH”) for Jackson. He hadn’t ridden since May so he was over-the-top excited to see Miss Kristy and his equine buddies. He goofed around and had a lot of fun. On Friday there was a program for the campers to exhibit the skills they learned throughout the week. Initially Jackson protested, stating he wasn’t going to participate. Now, he’s been riding at HDH for a year so I didn’t understand what the fuss was about. I told him he had to do it and give it his best shot. There were only four campers for the week, with Jackson being the youngest. He was the only child who required a lead line escort to perform the course. Everyone applauded after Jackson’s first performance (they were permitted two). That did it! He loved the praise and accolades and couldn’t wait to perform the course again. The second time it was a more confident and self-assured Jackson astride the horse.

I arranged Jackson’s summer camp schedule so he would have a week of downtime between camps. Of course he couldn’t wait to get back to HDH. Riding was all he talked about throughout his off week. During this week off my husband and I brokered a deal with Jackson. We told him that if he at least attempted to ride without a lead line in Friday’s show he could get a new train.

Jackson returned to the second week of camp a new child. He was determined to ride by himself—something he should be doing anyway, given his year of twice a week lessons. Jackson and I informed the camp instructor of our deal. She paired Jackson with a horse suited to his ability, and he set about learning to ride independently. He rose to the occasion. It was amazing to see not only the progress he made each day in his riding ability, but the confidence and self-assurance he gained as inherent by-products of his achievements as well. He was a new kid. He finally took ownership of his horsemanship instead of relying on the instructor to lead him around the ring. The latter simply enabled Jackson to lose focus and perpetuate a very lazy and passive approach to riding.
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I’m overjoyed to say Jackson did it! He met his goal of riding independently in Camp Horse Power’s Friday program, and performed the entire course twice. He knew exactly what he needed to do throughout the course, and responded appropriately to the instructor’s reminders regarding hand placement and posture. I was so extremely proud to watch him—more for his sake than my own. He worked hard throughout the week and it paid off. Whether you’re five, 50 or 105, who doesn’t love to feel that sense of accomplishment?

Great job, Jax! Your dad and I are so very proud of you. Now let’s go get that train.

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