Tag Archives: Dogs

Perseverated is not a bad word

per·sev·er·ate – To repeat a word, gesture, or act insistently or redundantly.

Recently, my husband and I made plans for a “date night” with our son.  Weather permitting (which it didn’t), we planned to go on a picnic dinner the following evening.  Our date was to include the three of us and our dogs at a local dog park.  My husband voiced the idea to our son prior to his bedtime one night this week.  The impending evening’s date was the first thing Jackson mentioned upon waking the following morning.  And according to Jackson’s teacher (the same day), he apparently “Perseverated on needing day to end so he could get to ‘date’ with mom and dad at dog park.”

I’m just spit balling here, but I don’t think the teacher’s note was written in a favorable tone.  And please understand, I don’t think Jackson’s teacher is being overtly critical or mean spirited when she pens notes such as this.  (This wasn’t the first time.)  But I’ve got to tell you, I also do not instinctively see a negative when I see a note such as this—probably to his teacher’s disappointment.  My mind (blessedly) isn’t wired for that.

As challenging as Jackson can be at times, I’m grateful I can see his light shining through.  Additionally, I’m able to remind myself of his difficult origins.  If it sounds as if I’m trivializing matters, please know I’m not.  And I’m also not saying I don’t sometimes lose my cool.  I do.  (See previous post from 1/23/2014 titled “Fail.”)  But I also know I drive myself most crazy when I let people of “authority” into my head.  That’s when I start to panic over Jackson’s “differences” and challenges.  It’s when we receive back-to-back reports of “defiance” and meltdowns that I literally go into overdrive researching autism spectrum disorder (“ASD”), Asperger’s Syndrome and sensory processing disorder (“SPD”).

With a clear head, at least for this moment, let me tell you what I really see when I read a notation such as the one mentioned above.  When I read the word “perseverate,” I see perseverance—a noun meaning steadfastness in doing something despite difficulty or delay in achieving success.

When I see the word “date,” I think of doing an activity with someone you might have a relationship with.

And as for the words “mom and dad,” well those are a given.  And they’re really special, considering Jackson’s origins as an orphan who spent his first five months of life in an orphanage in Ethiopia.  Truly.  Special.  I’m beyond humbled with gratitude over the titles “mom” and “dad.”  It’s one I sport proudly and don’t take lightly.

Sometimes it’s all about perspective.  The definition of which is:  The capacity to view things in their true relations or relative importance.  Thinking back to that same day, and the expectancy of a date night with Greg, Jackson and our dogs and some Chick-fil-A at the dog park?  I confess.  I perseverated too.  That’s the truth.  It’s the absolute truth.

Overwhelming Grace

For the first time in weeks I took (as in forcefully snatched it out of the day) the time this morning to go for a run.  I took our two energetic pointers with me.   Since it’s been awhile since our last run, It took a bit for us to get into synch.  As we were plodding along (read: sucking wind) early in the run, i was struck with the following thought.

Through the precious blood of Jesus, my husband and I are God’s adopted children.  In turn, God birthed the desire to adopt a child and facilitated Jackson’s adoption.  Then the three of us adopted these two knuckleheads (thought with all the love in my heart) running along with me. Truth be told, all five of us are as broken as the day is long.  Seriously.  Our family is a whole bucket full of whacky dysfunction, but God’s amazing grace covers each and every one of us.  And that makes it not only okay, but it makes life doable.  Even on the worst days when I want nothing more than to pull the covers up over my head and pretend I have nowhere to be, HE has got this. HE carries me.  Everything is gonna be alright.  And for that I’ll praise Him and worship Him all the days he grants me on this earth.  Thank you, LORD! Thank you.

Who Rescues Who?

Image

“Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our life whole.” ~ Roger Caras

This photo is an accurate portrayal of the love our son has for our dog, Geoffrey—a rescue from Ruff World Animal Adoptions in Central Florida.  He is the fourth canine family member (and third rescue) we’ve been blessed to share life with in the past twelve years.

Our dogs—the last two (Felix and now Geoffrey) in particular—have been vital to our family. They have proven to be effective touchstones for our son—having a somewhat grounding influence on him.  For me they have proven to be great stress reducers.  My favorite part of the day is lying in bed at night waiting for munchkin to fall asleep.  Geoffrey snoozes with his front and back legs draped over me while his head rests in my lap.  The room is dark except for the soft glow of a nightlight.  As I stroke the side of his face and run his velvety ear repeatedly through my fingers I can literally feel the stress of the day wash away.  (Studies have shown that petting a dog can lower your heart rate.)  Truth be told, if it weren’t for my husband waiting for me to spend some time with him, I could conceivably stay there all night for the inner peace I’m afforded in that sacred space.

If you are contemplating bringing a canine family member into your home I urge you to please consider adopting from a rescue or shelter.  There are so many wonderful, loving dogs in desperate need of a loving forever home.

An estimated 2.7 million healthy shelter pets are not adopted each year, and only about 30 percent of pets in homes come from shelters and rescues.

U.S. shelter and adoption estimates

  • 83.3 million—Number of owned dogs
  • 20 percent—Percentage of owned dogs who were adopted from animal shelters
  • 3,500—Number of animal shelters
  • 6 to 8 million—Number of cats and dogs entering shelters each year
  • 25 percent—Percentage of purebred dogs in shelters
  • 3 to 4 million—Number cats and dogs adopted from shelters each year
  • 2.7 million—Number of adoptable cats and dogs euthanized in shelters each year

                                                                                     ~ 2013-2014 statistics according to the Humane Society of the US