Why We Support Autism Speaks (And why you should to.)

It’s no secret our family supports Autism Speaks. And although our son is on the spectrum, our support isn’t based on any tangible benefit received from the organization. Our support is rooted solely in the commonality we’ve found within.

If you know our story, you know I recognized symptoms of autism in our son, Jackson, very early on. Our son was officially diagnosed in early November 2011, just three weeks shy of his third birthday. Although I had suspected autism for quite some time, I was devastated when the neurologist delivered the diagnosis. I was so fearful of the unknowns. I had no idea what life held for our son and was terrified of facing the future with a “team” comprised solely of my husband and me. In retrospect, my fears were unfounded, but that was my reality at that point in time.

Following our son’s diagnosis, I found a much-needed sense of community within Autism Speaks. I perused the organization’s website ad nauseam. As anticipated, I found a wealth of statistics, information and resources. We participated in our first Walk Now For Autism Speaks in 2013. Words cannot express the overwhelming sense of community I felt when we stepped into a literal sea of families at that first Walk. It was overwhelming and very much needed.

So you see, this is why Autism Speaks is an organization near and dear to our hearts. Please join us in supporting them. If not for our family, then do it to benefit the millions of other families affected by autism. Chances are, this means you.

#1in68

About 1 percent of the world population has autism spectrum disorder. (CDC, 2014)

Prevalence in the United States is estimated at 1 in 68 births. (CDC, 2014)

More than 3.5 million Americans live with an autism spectrum disorder. (Buescher et al., 2014)

Cost of lifelong care can be reduced by 2/3 with early diagnosis and intervention. (Autism Society estimate based on Government Accounting Office Report on Autism, 2006)

2 thoughts on “Why We Support Autism Speaks (And why you should to.)

  1. messesandlove

    My daughter was diagnosed with Autism recently. I actually just floated the idea to my husband about building a team for a autism speaks walk today! I am glad to hear that the walks are so helpful in building a community because the diagnosis is really isolating.

    Reply
    1. bobbie731 Post author

      Knowing my message has been heard has blessed me, Catie. I know full well how isolating autism is. I don’t know how old your daughter is, but I can tell you you adapt, which allows you to live a more meaningful and transparent life. With us, our life is a life of quality versus quantity. And that quality is so very rich. We celebrate EVERY victory–no matter how small. Tonight, our son tried a bite of pasta. That’s a MAJOR victory! I praised him as if he conquered Mount Everest. You will find a new normal, but in the meantime do participate in your local Walk. It is made for your family! Blessings to you, my friend.

      Reply

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